Superior Court Ruling Reminds Employers to Quickly Pay Wages Owed to Departing Employees


A recent superior court decision reminds employers how important it is to be sure that departing employees receive all the wages they earn, and fast. It also makes the point that, even if the payment requirements of the Massachusetts Wage Act are violated, correcting such a mistake can dramatically reduce the risks that an employer will suffer the rather draconian penalties of the Act.

The Wage Act requires employers to pay fired employees all the wages they are owed on the date they are let go. For those who quit, wages must be paid on the next regular pay date. Failure to do so exposes employers to mandatory triple damages — that is, three times the amount of the unpaid wages — along with reimbursement of a former worker’s legal fees. The Act provides that employers cannot defend against a triple damages claim by paying wages due “after the bringing of the complaint.”

Because the Wage Act requires employees to first file complaints for unpaid wages with the Massachusetts Attorney General, the meaning of this phrase is a bit foggy. In the case Littlefield v. Adcole Corp., the employee contended, as many do, that filing with the AG triggers the triple damages provisions of the Act. As of that date, he had not received his wages, which were later paid prior to the date he filed his superior court suit. Still, the employee argued, he was entitled to triple damages because payment was made after his AG complaint was filed. Rejecting this contention, the court found that the employer is not required to pay triple the wages due and instead is liable only for triple the amount of interest lost by the employee during the period of delay of his wage payment. In so doing, the court interpreted the Act to require payment in full before a civil lawsuit is filed.