Not so Fast, Department of Labor — Here come the Republicans (Again)


In a move that once again smacks of partisan politics, Texas and Nevada are leading a 21-state challenge to the U.S. Department of Labor’s recent update to overtime regulations for white collar workers. Not surprisingly, 20 are led by Republican governors. The suit claims that President Obama’s Department of Labor exceeded its authority in enacting the regulatory updates, which are scheduled to take effect December 1, 2016. Its focus appears to be the procedure employed to make the changes, though Republican leaders are plainly more concerned with the new rule’s substance.

The Department announced earlier this year that, after lengthy study that included the review of almost 300,000 comments to the proposed regulatory updates, the following changes would take effect later this year:

  1. An increase in the minimum salary that must be paid to white collar workers who otherwise are exempt from overtime pay requirements, from $455/week to $913/week ($47,476 per year). Workers who make less than this amount must receive overtime, regardless of other factors;
  2. An increase in the ‘highly paid’ employee exemption for white collar workers from $100,000/year to $134,004/year. Workers whose earnings exceed this amount will be exempt from overtime pay; and
  3. A mechanism for automatically adjusting the minimum and highly paid thresholds to keep up with inflation.

Opponents of the changes are concerned with their effect on business; they predict dire consequences if the rules are implemented. Joining the 21 states in suing to block the new regulations is a coalition of 50 businesses led by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Not surprisingly, both suits were filed in Texas for the obvious reason that the litigants hope to again find a sympathetic ear in a court that has previously shown its predilection against President Obama’s initiatives.