Court Rejects Another Expansion of At-Will Employment Rule


Yet another attempt to expand the public policy exception to the Massachusetts at-will employment rule has fallen by the wayside. This time, the court rejected a former employee’s challenge to his firing based on a concept termed, “honest, open and accountable government.”

“The question what exactly is required by the policy of open, honest and accountable government… is both difficult to define and open to debate,” the Appeals Court wrote on August 4, 2016. “The Supreme Judicial Court…has made clear that the public policy exception must be construed narrowly in order to avoid effectively imposing a just cause requirement for termination of at will employees….”

The at-will employment rule provides that either employees or their employers are free to end their working relationship at any time, for any reason, and either with or without cause. This means that employees generally have no recourse when fired except as may be provided by particular laws. The Massachusetts anti-discrimination law and anti-retaliation language in the state’s Wage Act are examples. Absent those legal protections, employees can challenge their firings only if they can identify an exception to the at-will rule.  Exceptions are few and far between.

In Tramontozzi v. Mass. Dept. of Transportation, a former employee of the Massachusetts Transportation Department claimed he was unfairly made a scapegoat after a light fixture fell from the Central Artery Tunnel in Boston. He accused the Department of unfairly blaming him for alleged delayed disclosure of the incident in order to provide cover for higher authorities. While the Appeals Court agreed that government should be open and honest, it declined to create a public policy exception to the at-will rule on this basis.