New Pregnancy Law Takes Effect April 1; Employers should have Written Policies in Place by Now

Effective on April 1, 2018, Massachusetts will institute its new pregnancy statute. The law brings broad new protections for pregnant employees, some of which benefit women after a child is born, and imposes important obligations on employers. Among them is a written pregnancy policy, which all employers should have already put into place.

The Pregnant Workers Fairness Act was signed last summer by Gov. Charlie Baker. It generally requires employers to treat pregnant employees in the same manner as disabled workers. This includes obligations to implement reasonable workplace accommodations and engage pregnant women for purposes of identifying modifications that will allow them to remain on the job. The specific commands of the new pregnancy law instruct employers to do the following.

  • Provide private, non-bathroom space for lactating mothers.
  • Allow extra leave time as needed beyond the 8 or 12 weeks required by current law for mothers to recover from the effects of childbirth.
  • Restore women to their prior or an equivalent job, with no loss of benefits, when the need for an accommodation ends.
  • Do not penalize women by denying them opportunities based on accommodations for pregnancy or lactation.
  • Do not force pregnant or lactating women to accept accommodations they do not want, unless it’s necessary to allow a woman to perform the essential functions of her job.
  • Do not require women to take a leave of absence for pregnancy or lactation unless it’s required to avoid undue hardship on the employer.
  • Do not refuse to hire an otherwise qualified woman due to her pregnancy or related needs.

Written employer policies should cover these issues as they generally inform employees about their rights under the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act. It makes sense for employers to review hiring and other practices to ensure that the rights of pregnant employees are not inadvertently infringed. Training is likely wise for certain employers, particularly larger ones. Penalties for violating the new pregnancy law can be steep and include lost wages, emotional damages and legal fees incurred by affected employees.