Archives for December 2016

SJC Holds that Second Element of Independent Contractor Test is Preempted by Federal Law

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court today weighed in on the hot topic whether and to what extent the state’s Independent Contractor Statute is exempted as applied to courier drivers and the companies they work for. Like a federal court that ruled on the same question last year, the SJC concluded that the second of the law’s three elements is preempted by the Federal Aviation Administration Authorization Act (FAAAA).

Legal battle over the applicability of Mass. Gen. L. ch. 149, §148B has raged for years, with courier companies seeking to avoid application of what’s referred to as Prong B of the statute – the requirement that all individuals who perform services within a company’s regular course of business be classified as employees. The companies rely on the FAAAA’s restriction against state laws that impact the prices, routes or services of covered businesses. Because Prong B is so broad, they contend, it effectively bars all uses of contractors to make deliveries. This, in turn, forces courier companies to eliminate services, increase costs, alter routes, and make other business changes.

Though two state judges had previously ruled that the entire Independent Contractor Statute was preempted by the FAAAA, the SJC rejected this approach. The law’s first and third elements thus remain intact. In order to avoid classifying their drivers as employees, courier companies must demonstrate that they do not control the performance of their work and that the drivers are customarily engaged in an independent business. There are currently several active cases on this topic, including two class action suits being handled by my office.

Legislators Work to Revive Noncompetition Law

Recent reports suggest that Massachusetts legislators are continuing to work on a compromise noncompetition law that will garner enough support to become law. Earlier this year, both the House and Senate passed versions of a proposed statute that would have imposed rules on noncompetition agreements, which are currently governed by judges without direction from a formal statute. Because the House and Senate could not reach a compromise over differences in the bills each passed, the proposed statute died with the end of the legislative session on July 31, 2016.

Indications are that, this and other failures notwithstanding, Massachusetts will soon enact a law to govern the uses of noncompetition agreements. Among the provisions now being discussed are ones that would require advance notice to employees, limit the duration and applicability of restrictive covenants, and require employers to continue to pay some portion of a former employee’s salary as a condition to enforcement. If no deal is reached informally this month, legislation will almost certainly be reintroduced when the House and Senate reconvene in January 2017. Any bill they pass must, of course, be signed by the governor.