Archives for February 2016

Massachusetts Attorney General Collects Pay Disparity Data from Employers

In apparent anticipation of proposed changes the state legislature is now considering making to the Massachusetts Equal Pay Act – or, perhaps, in an effort to help determine whether and what changes may make sense – the Massachusetts Attorney General is reportedly using its general records inspection authority to demand a wide range of new employee data.

A recent article by Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly reports that the requests differ from those normally sent by the AG. They seek more demographic data and job details with an apparent focus on whether pay disparities based on gender and/or race exist. The requests ask for information such as employee names, genders, ethnicities, job titles, pay, and job descriptions.

The AG has general authority to seek certain payroll and related information from Massachusetts employers. It typically does so as parts of audits or investigations that may be initiated by specific employee complaints about pay practices. Employers from whom such information is sought are generally required by statute to provide it, and it therefore behooves them to ensure that the full and complete records required by law are properly maintained. Penalties and other damages can flow from failures to do so.

Small Employer Forced to Pay more than $100,000 for Wage Violations

A local grocer is learning the hard way how important it is not only to properly pay employees under state wage laws but to keep good records demonstrating that it did so. Following an investigation by the Massachusetts Attorney General’s wage and hour office, the employer was compelled to pay $84,000 in back wages and $21,000 more in penalties. As if that’s not enough, the store and its owner also had their names posted on the Attorney General’s web site so that all could read about their violations of state laws.

The case illustrates the importance of understanding and complying with Massachusetts laws that cover the payment of wages. They include the state’s Wage Act, which requires that employees receive pay for all hours — and minutes — they work and provides mandatory triple damages and legal fees against employers who fail to comply. Massachusetts also has its own overtime and minimum wage statutes, each of which provides broader benefits to employees than do federal counterparts. The state mandates that all employers keep accurate records of hours worked by and payments made to their employees, among other things, and generally requires that workers be treated as employees and not independent contractors. The mandatory triple damage and legal fee rules normally apply to legal transgressions in any of these areas.