Moving Jobs in Face of Noncompetition Agreements takes Advance Planning

Moving jobs can be stressful, even when motivated by promises of better pay, a chance to move up the business ladder, or a more pleasant work experience. When a new job is in the same industry as the old, as is frequently the case, the stress that naturally comes with new job challenges can be compounded by a former employer’s concerns over uses of its business information. In some cases, those concerns are documented by writings that include substantial penalties for disclosing or misusing confidential data. Employees commonly sign such agreements without giving them much thought, until, that is, it’s time to move jobs. It’s at that point that many discover they may be restricted from competing at all with their former employers.

Navigating issues like these takes some planning. Here are a few steps employees should consider taking before signing on with a new company or resigning from a current one.

  1. Make sure you are familiar with all the documents you signed with your current company. If you need to, ask to see the contents of your personnel file. It is not uncommon for employees to discover restrictive agreements that they don’t recall signing. If you don’t understand your agreement, seek legal help.
  2. Consider what access you’ve had to internal documents and how, if at all, any information that may be contained in them could be used with a new employer. The answer to this question normally turns on the nature of an employee’s job.
  3. Be sure your prospective new employer is aware of any restrictive covenants you may have signed with your current one. Most now require new employees to affirm that they have no restrictions that affect performance in a new job. Failing to disclose relevant information can lead to big trouble down the road.
  4. Don’t keep copies of any of your current employer’s documents, whether in paper or electronic form, regardless of content. It is best to err on the side or returning documents that are not confidential than to keep any that even arguably are. Be sure that key materials or customer information is not stored on a personal phone or laptop. If it is, consider the potential for future disputes.
  5. If you signed a noncompetition or non-solicitation agreement, carefully coordinate your conduct in a new job with your prospective employer. Consider the reaction your current company will have to your job move and how you can minimize the risks that may be associated with that reaction. Carefully plan and execute your departure from your current employer.